The Get Real Video Blog

www.getrealvideo.com

Archive for March 2013

An Insider’s Story – Mobile Sales Manager, The Guardian

leave a comment »

Deutsch: logo der tageszeitung the guardian

The Guardian (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What is your job?

I am Mobile Sales Manager at The Guardian, responsible for a team who generates advertising revenue across Guardian content on mobile phones and tablets whilst also working with our product and editorial teams to identify trends in the market and how The Guardian can monetise these.

How did you get into it

In a haphazard way. I have been at The Guardian for 5 years and was promoted into this role two years ago. Before that I was recruiting into the media sales industry and saw candidates I was convinced I was better than, doing jobs I knew were interesting and was sure that I could do well in this industry so I put myself forward for them as I knew all the hiring managers and convinced them to take a leftfield choice.

What do you enjoy about it?

I am working for a media owner that produces quality content on the latest most interesting technology; it’s the perfect marriage! My role is to shape the future of a new area by determining its strategy and ensuring it delivers results. I get to work with the people who write the content, build the products, market our brands and sell advertising internally whilst externally I am talking to marketing directors of blue chip brands. It’s multi-faceted.

What do you wish you had known before you entered your industry?

That I should have joined it upon graduation and not 10 years into my career and how I should have had the drive I have now instead of drawing a salary 10 years ago. A crystal ball to see the incomprehensible growth of digital media would have been nice too!

Top tips for someone wanting to start out in your sector

Know the market you are in, appreciate you cannot know it all so treasure the brilliant people you work with and if you are going into a sales role make sure you make things happen instead of waiting for them to happen to you.

Our contributing writers are professionals who have valuable advice to offer. We assess and approve all our contributors to ensure their content is expert and relevant.

Written by getrealvideo

March 26, 2013 at 3:00 pm

An Insider’s Story – Barrister, Criminal Law

leave a comment »

Part of our growing Insider Stories, where professionals share their advice and experience

"The Old Bailey, Known Also as the Centra...

“The Old Bailey, Known Also as the Central Criminal Court” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What is your job?
Barrister specialising in criminal law.

How did you get into it?
Entry is by applying to chambers for a pupillage, which you can do before, during or after sitting the Bar exams.

What do you enjoy about it?
Being an advocate is quite addictive as many criminal barristers will tell you. It is a combination of theatre, having to think on your feet and being able to judge the mood/temperature  of the court, I.e. both that of the jury and the Judge. As you are self employed you have a great deal of independence. It is a very friendly profession with a great deal of opportunity for friendship and socialising if you want it; those who see it as a 9-5 job and operate in this way are missing the point.

What do you wish you had known before you entered your industry?
It involves putting in a lot of hours if you are going to be successful. Remuneration now is relatively poor as the vast majority of the work is publicly funded. The competition for work is substantial as increasingly work is done in house by solicitor advocates. A great deal has to be done so as to cultivate contacts who will send you work. It is not a job that anyone should embark on unless they are completely committed and see it as a vocation.

Top tips for someone wanting to start out in your sector
Getting into other areas of law which are not publicly funded will be much more remunerative, albeit less advocacy is likely to be involved. Becoming a solicitor affords much greater job and financial security; and you can always transfer to the Bar later once you have an amount of experience under your belt.

Our contributing writers are professionals who have valuable advice to offer. We assess and approve all our contributors to ensure their content is expert and relevant.

Written by getrealvideo

March 19, 2013 at 9:00 am

Posted in Insider stories

An Insider’s Story – Art and Creative Director, Advertising

leave a comment »

Mad Men - Advertising Agencies

Mad Men – Advertising Agencies (Photo credit: DavidErickson)

What is your job?
Art Director and Creative Director in the Advertising Industry. Creating campaigns for major US and UK companies, writing, art directing and heading Creative departments. Hiring and training relevant personnel.

How did you get into it?
Left school at 14, scholarship to art school aged 15, after graduation secured first job in an Advertising Agency, writing to some 40 – 50 companies. 8 interviews.

What do you enjoy about it?
The variety, the everyday challenges, the fun you could have at the expense of other peoples money.  The satisfaction when something you’ve created actually works!

What do you wish you had known before you entered your industry?
It took me a long time to earn a reasonable salary in a rich industry. It is often luck and talent and hard work. You need patience to stick it out and self belief that you can learn to be better.

Top tips for someone wanting to start out in your sector
If you work for a bum company, get out asap even if they pay you well. You get work and jobs by going and continuing to go for high standards. Remember to take the advice from people above you with experience.

Written by getrealvideo

March 12, 2013 at 9:00 am

Posted in Insider stories

I’ve got a week’s work experience with

leave a comment »

I’ve got a week’s work experience with my dream company How do I make the most of it??

question0011-1

User’s question posted on http://www.getrealvideo.com

Part of our growing Q & A series of videos. http://ow.ly/irh8v

Written by getrealvideo

March 6, 2013 at 1:55 pm

Posted in Daily posts

Graduate Careers: What I wish I’d known before I had to start one

with one comment

English: Rosemead_Graduates.JPG

English: Rosemead_Graduates.JPG (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

My story is one that I imagine will be familiar to lots of other twenty-something graduates out there.

Having done well at school, with absolutely no idea what I wanted to be in life, I went to uni to study an arts subject. Three years later, armed with my 2:1 and perfect CV of good grades and extracurriculars, I have found the job search a real struggle.

When I was at school I was told that it really didn’t matter what you studied as long as you did well and came out with a decent mark at the end, because at the end of the day, university was only about “discipline” and “showing you could achieve things”.

Unfortunately for this generation, a lot has changed since that advice was given. Following the recession, fewer jobs have been available for graduates, meaning that the numbers of young people doing masters degrees has risen. This, along with the emergence of the dreaded internship, has caused the meaning of the word ‘graduate’ to change beyond all recognition. Graduates who get jobs are those with MAs or several unpaid internships under their belts, meaning that in a still tight job market, those with only a BA and a handful of extracurriculars don’t get a look in.

So what’s the solution? Well, I don’t have all the answers but I can tell you things I wish I’d realised a long time ago:

First of all, be prepared. If you know what you want to do in life, arm yourself with as many tools as possible to enable you to get there. If you want to be a journalist, build up your portfolio as much as you can and do as much work experience as possible. Doing work experience whilst studying means you won’t have to do unpaid internships after you graduate – just be sure to make contacts and keep in touch.

If you don’t know what you want to do in life, do work experience anyway. Try and work it out along the way by finding placements you like and checking off the ones you don’t. And once you’ve found the path you want, pursue it. I always thought that with academics on my side, the world would be my oyster and I’d just easily fall into something great. I now know it doesn’t work like that – you’ve got to do as much legwork to find your career as you do for your academics, because it won’t find you.

And lastly, think carefully about each decision you make. In no way do I regret doing an arts degree, but I wish I’d thought more carefully about how it would pan out afterwards and what it would actually qualify me to do. For example, if you want to be a lawyer, by all means study French, but that alone won’t get you a training contract afterwards. You can still have both, just make sure to get involved in law society and do as much legal work experience as possible to give you the edge and get your name out there.

Finding the right job is never easy, and that’s all the more true for today’s graduates. But all is not lost and you can still have the career of your dreams, just do everything you can to get yourself onto that ladder and you’ll soon be ahead of the game.

Written by getrealvideo

March 5, 2013 at 9:00 am

%d bloggers like this: