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Archive for December 2012

An Insider’s Story – Publishing

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Part of our growing Insider Stories, where professionals share their advice and experience

Published!

Published! (Photo credit: JoshuaDavisPhotography)

I sell books for a Publisher.  I sell primary custom book products (boxsets, special editions and other one-off products) to Trade customers including WHSmith and Tesco.  I also create large scale promotional offers eg multi-buy paperback promotions for supermarkets such as Tesco, ASDA, Sainsbury and Morrisons.  I also sell to non-Trade book retailers such as The Works.

I have always been a book lover and it sometimes seemed too simplistic to say that I just wanted to work with books but when I think about it in those terms I am lucky to be doing what I do.  Originally I wanted to work as an editor, which is what most people think of when they think of Publishing.  I began working as an assistant in the Commercial dept of the BBC where they licensed programme material.  I worked helping to assist the Sales Manager license rights to Publishers to create book tie-ins to programmes.  From there, I then got a job working in the Sales dept of an illustrated book Publisher.  It was a small company and I was able to get an overview of all parts of the publishing process.

I like being able to work with books but be focused on the commercial side of the business.  Being surrounded by creative people can be very stimulating but also quite frustrating at times so I like to have the mix and be able to approach the books that I sell from a commercial perspective.  It’s not always possible to love every book but the thought that you can make money out of them means it’s always interesting.  I also like working on the non-traditional side of the business.  It’s sometimes quite hard to explain to someone not in the industry that you don’t just sell new books to Waterstones or Amazon but it’s a very unique side of the business and contains some very unique characters.

I think that the things I wish I had known aren’t necessarily restricted to my industry. The main thing I wish I had known is how many passengers a big company can carry who don’t pull their weight.  When you’ve got a customer who wants to buy something, hearing the phrase ‘it’s not my job’ and getting passed around can drive you mad.

Book publishing is going through a rather turbulent transition at the moment.  The rapid growth of e book sales, internet shopping, and the impact of the recession on the high street means that my industry is changing rapidly.  I don’t think anyone really knows what the next few years will bring.  People will still want to read books but how they read them and where they buy them may be very different to now.  Although there seems to be no shortage of people wanting to enter the industry I think if you want to get in you should have a flexible attitude and be prepared to start anywhere.  Digital marketing and a working understanding of social media seem to be the main buzzwords at the moment.

Our contributing writers are professionals who have valuable advice to offer. We assess and approve all our contributors to ensure their content is expert and relevant.
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Written by getrealvideo

December 31, 2012 at 9:00 am

Posted in Insider stories

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An Insider’s Story – Working in the third sector (charitable organisations)

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Part of our growing Insider Stories, where professionals share their advice and experience

Voluntary sector is easy pickings

(Photo credit: HowardLake)

I work in the third sector at an innovative Children’s Charity that caters for those from challenging backgrounds. I head a department called Positive Experiences for Young People. Working in a team; together we awaken aspiration to help a young person to realise their full potential by leveraging a plethora of opportunities to ensure they can experience and move towards a career that they are passionate about. Our gateways are through work experiences, internships, shadowing, confidence building, higher education and volunteer trips in the UK and overseas.  It’s a fast-paced, dynamic, rewarding environment and no two days are ever the same.

I got this role after reading about the charity in the national news. The article moved me so much that I was compelled to write to the founder outlining my background, my current skill-set and what I felt I could offer the organisation. After spending ten years in marketing, I have been fortunate and resourceful enough to be able to transfer my skills to a sector that is equally creative; only this time around, the young people are the clients.

If you are thinking about joining the third sector, then in order to thrive I would recommend a cause that you are passionate about because it’s not about the money. Take some time to do some research, volunteer (in any capacity) and get a feel for where you think you could add value. Don’t be afraid to make a speculative enquiry, you may be able to offer something that they hadn’t thought about. If you know somebody that already works there, then ask to meet them for a coffee, they may be able to offer ideas and most people in the third sector love to help! If the charity you want to work for does not have a recruitment budget, then be bold, there are many organisations that may be able to fund your role.

Our contributing writers are professionals who have valuable advice to offer. We assess and approve all our contributors to ensure their content is expert and relevant.

Written by getrealvideo

December 27, 2012 at 9:00 am

An Insider’s Story – Midwife

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Part of our growing Insider Stories, where professionals share their advice and experience

Saint Thomas’ Hospital, London.

Saint Thomas’ Hospital, London. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hi, my name is Alex and I am a qualified midwife at St Thomas’ Hospital in Westminster. When I was 13, my mum was pregnant with my little brother and I remember being absolutely fascinated by what was happening to her body. I decided then that I wanted to be a midwife.

As a midwife you must ensure the safety of both mothers and their babies.  At the age of 18 I felt too young to take on this responsibility, so I decided to train for 3 years to become a nurse at Kings College London first. I then consolidated my nurse training for 1 year as a gynaecology nurse before commencing an 18 month degree in midwifery back at Kings College London.

I took a long winded route to becoming a midwife as you can take the 3 year direct entry midwifery degree/ diploma course.  Training to become a nurse first gave me the opportunity to mature and also gain vital knowledge of health, as not every woman is straightforward in pregnancy and birth.

Being a midwife is such an amazing job. Although it can be stressful and high pressured at times, I feel honoured to be a part of an amazing life event in people’s lives. The role of the midwife is so diverse and is not just about delivering babies. There are many areas within maternity services you can work in as a midwife for example: looking after women who would like a home birth in the community, case loading teenagers who are pregnant or caring for women who are high risk and require specialist care.

Being a midwife has given me the knowledge and skills needed to set up my own private antenatal classes, check out my website www.birthingbloom.com. My passion is to give parents-to-be the knowledge they need to feel prepared and relaxed on their pregnancy journey.

Our contributing writers are professionals who have valuable advice to offer. We assess and approve all our contributors to ensure their content is expert and relevant.

Written by getrealvideo

December 24, 2012 at 9:00 am

Entrepreneur Stories – Tips for getting into Personal Training and setting up at Personal Training business.

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Personal Training Overlooking Melbourne Catego...

Personal Training Overlooking Melbourne Category:Fitness_training Category:Personal_training (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Part of our growing Entrepreneur Stories series, where professionals share their advice and experience

If you think you are interested in a career as a Personal Trainer, you can attend one of the many open days/evenings on offer from top training providers (YMCA/Premier etc) and get a taste of what the courses might be like, and what the job involves in reality.

You can train to be a Personal Trainer at weekends, and start to build your business slowly so you aren’t risking your day job.

  • Train in a specialism – I chose pre and post-natal women.  I’d advise that you pick something that will likely lead to you working with people you’ll get on well with.  The better your rapport with your clients, the more likely your business is to thrive.
  • Read everything you can!  Read books on how to set up a business, books on how to set up a Personal Training business, books on fitness, health.  Really know your subject matter.
  • Make sure you set up a website, and make it as professional as you can afford.  The more information you can provide regarding your expertise and qualifications, the more likely you’ll be to win business.
  • Take time to define your USP.  What makes you unique?  Why will people want to train with you?  This is vital if you are working for yourself, but also crucial if you are part of an array of trainers in a gym – why will people pick you over others?
  • Have fun – this is absolutely vital.  People come to a Personal Trainer to exercise and enjoy themselves.  Make sure that you have a positive attitude each and every session.
  • When I first started I was surprised at the level of trust I was able to build with my clients.  They share many of the ups and downs of their lives with you – it’s a real privilege and one of the aspects of being a Personal Trainer that I enjoy the most.  I also get a real buzz out of seeing clients reaching their goals and flying the nest!
Our contributing writers are professionals who have valuable advice to offer. We assess and approve all our contributors to ensure their content is expert and relevant.

suzanne

http://suzmorrison.com/index.html

 

Written by getrealvideo

December 20, 2012 at 2:00 pm

An Insider’s Story – Yoga teacher

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Part of our growing Insider Stories, where professionals in all sorts of jobs, share their advice and experience

Hi. My name is Sarah and I teach Yoga.

I had been practicing yoga for a few years when one of my teachers suggested that I qualify to teach it. I undertook the intense training and have been teaching now for over 5 years.

Initially, a passion for yoga was the catalyst for the career move from fashion but since then, I have also been motivated by the other skills that are needed to run successful classes. I have learnt skills that I’d never had an interest or experience in before such as basic accounting, advertising (with the use of Google Adwords) and I have even build my own website. I have become self-employed which felt risky at first but I now love the freedom and self-worth that it gives me and has meant that I have had to push my limits and take on new challenges.

No day is the same and I especially enjoy the group classes that I teach – many of my students have been attending class for a few years and each class has its own dynamic and community.

www.yogawithsarah.co.uk

 

Our contributing writers are professionals who have valuable advice to offer. We assess and approve all our contributors to ensure their content is expert and relevant.

Written by getrealvideo

December 6, 2012 at 9:00 am

An Insider’s Story – The Army

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The Royal Military Academy Sandhurst is the ho...

The Royal Military Academy Sandhurst is the home of British Army officer training (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Part of our growing Insider Stories, where professionals in all sorts of jobs, share their advice and experience

I joined the British Army after University.

While School & University had been challenging academically, I wanted to be able to prove that I could lead soldiers in the field, regardless of the conditions.  Having left the Army over ten years ago, I reflect on how fortunate I was to be able to spend a year at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst.

Sure, it can be extremely tough, but it has to be one of the finest leadership schools in the world.  Nowhere else are you put through your paces by such excellent instructors and tested physically and mentally to your limits.

Further training at the School of Infantry followed before I joined my platoon in Germany.  Soldiers come from all walks of life: some had degrees like me, others could barely read or write but had more common sense than their newly appointed platoon commander!  An emergency tour of the Balkans followed during which I was able to put my training into practice, on occasions under enemy fire.

The feeling when you look around and realize that your men are following you because you are their leader is quite something. Daily life in the Army is varied and will depend on your posting and the prevailing situation: few days are the same and you are given a huge amount of latitude in developing and leading your soldiers.  A short service commission has been an excellent grounding for adult life, given me self respect, physical fitness, mental toughness and war stories which those who haven’t served might not benefit from.

Our contributing writers are professionals who have valuable advice to offer. We assess and approve all our contributors to ensure their content is expert and relevant.

Written by getrealvideo

December 5, 2012 at 4:35 pm

An Insider’s Story – 5 top tips about writing for the theatre

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Part of our growing Insider Stories, where professionals in all sorts of different jobs, share their advice and experience

1. Plays take a long time to reach the stage, usually at least two years. so avoid being too topical. e.g. many writers will be using the 2012 Olympics as the base of a drama, so maybe avoid that one. Present your play professionally. Most managements have a panel of readers and nobody feels well disposed towards the grimy script with the coffee stains on it. Number the pages and staple or bind them. And be sure to list your contact details.
2. When you write your play, be mindful about the size of the cast. Everybody has to be paid for rehearsal and performances, so each character should be essential to the plot. A small cast will increase your chances of placing your play.
3. Investigate your sources. There is little point on sending a 40 minute one act to a management famous for staging West End extravaganzas. Attend theatres whenever you can.  And check on the web to see who has produced what.
4. Be patient. Remember that new work is the life blood of producers. So far from wanting  to block you, they are but always hoping to discover new talent.  Take rejections in your stride and move on. If your work is original and has merit, you will get there eventually.
5. It’s hard to get an agent at first. But when you get one, don’t just sit back expecting things to happen. Consult your agent often, offer suggestions and ask for feedback. And take your agent’s advice about revising your work. You have to – because an agent cannot feign enthusiasm about a play he thinks needs fixing.

Geraldine Arons is an award-winning Irish playwright. Her plays show worldwide to great acclaim and 12 have been performed on TV or radio.

Geraldine Arons, Playwright

Our contributing writers are professionals who have valuable advice to offer. We assess and approve all our contributors to ensure their content is expert and relevant.

Written by getrealvideo

December 5, 2012 at 3:30 pm

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